30+ of the best newsletter names (and how to name yours)

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Something magical happens when you give your project a name.

It becomes real.

That idea that you’ve tossed around for a month, a year, or (be honest) a lifetime starts to solidify. Whether an email newsletter is step one or one hundred in your creator journey, it deserves a name.

As scary as it can be to start something new, it’s even more challenging to come up with a name that feels just right.

Raise your hand if you’ve scratched out countless options. We’ve all been there.

Luckily, you don’t need to reinvent the wheel to come up with great newsletter names. That’s because we’ve found a few tried and true formulas to help you crack the code on newsletter name ideas.

30+ of the best newsletter names (and how to name yours)

Why your newsletter needs a name

If you’ve ever struggled to come up with a newsletter name that you click with, you probably asked yourself, “do I really need to name this?” at least once. The truth is that your newsletter name is part of your brand, which means it’s a small but essential detail to engage with your audience.

Picking a name for your newsletter will help you:

Build brand awareness

A consistent and memorable name helps keep you—and your brand—top of mind. A unique name is also easier to refer to since it stands out in your mind. Finally, a newsletter name that stands out in the inbox can boost open rates and engagement.

Build a loyal community with newsletters

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Look official

Your brand is never too small to treat with care and respect. Consistent naming and branding help you present as the leader you are. Nearly 70% of consumers state that clear mission and values on a company’s website or socials build trust, and the name you choose can go a long way in establishing positioning.

Anne-Laure Le Cunff, whose Maker Mind newsletter reaches over 20,000 subscribers every week, shares:

“With a separate name, the Maker Mind newsletter became a mini-publication, related yet independent of the core business. Having a separate name gave me the flexibility to create other newsletters in the future, with different content and target audiences. For instance, I currently have another newsletter just for paid members, called The Ness Letter.”Anne-Laure Le Cunff, founder of Maker Mind

Anne-Laure Le Cunff, founder of Maker Mind

Create exclusivity

Personalized content is key to growing your newsletter, and a creative name designates a space for your best content. You can use this exclusivity to your advantage on your newsletter’s landing page, just like Teela Cunningham does with her weekly newsletter, the Tuesday Tribe. The people in her newsletter are the “first to nab special deals” when they’re part of the Tribe.

A unique and catchy newsletter name gives subscribers a feeling of exclusivity. Image via Tuesday Tribe.
A unique and catchy newsletter name gives subscribers a feeling of exclusivity. Image via Tuesday Tribe.

How to name your newsletter

We promised newsletter name ideas, so it’s time to deliver. There are two parts in our method to help you name your newsletter—an associated word brainstorm and plugging your terms into creative naming formulas.

Brainstorm words related to your content

The words you end up choosing have a significant impact on what potential readers assume about your brand. You need fuel to make newsletter formulas work, and at this stage, there are no bad ideas.

Start making a list of words that include your name, niche, and unique perspective. Sometimes, looking through lists of adjectives, phrases, and adverbs can help. Don’t worry about editing at this stage. Even if you don’t love a term, write it down, because it may inspire a different idea.

If the flywheels aren’t turning, think about who your target audience is, how you want them to feel, and how you want to help them.

We’ve come up with a few theoretical newsletter names for different audiences in the same niche to illustrate this. As you review them, think about who each would target and what their perspective might be:

  • Bashful Baker vs. Baking Without Borders
  • Parents Who Podcast vs. The Podcast Professor
  • Glamorous Gallivant vs. Have Budget, Will Travel

Khe Hy, who has been called the “Oprah for Millennials” and writes for more than 20,000 subscribers, said:

“I’m from New York City, and I grew up as a fan of skateboard culture and surfing. I always had a kind of ‘chilled-out’ West Coast vibe to me even though I’d never lived there. I worked in finance and knew a lot of older, important people, and I thought it was just so funny that I could force them to say the word “rad.” As a writer, I love alliterations, so I added Reads.”Khe Hy, founder of RadReads

Khe Hy, founder of RadReads

Try your words through these formulas

If your brainstorm list looks messy, don’t fret. To help you out, we compiled a long list of our favorite newsletter names and asked, “what do these have in common?” The result is eight formulas to try on for size.

Formula #1: The [adjective] [noun]

The first formula is the simplest. All you need to do is take an adjective of choice and attach it to who you are or what you do.

Here are our favorite examples:

 

Thinking about how you want to help readers may inspire your newsletter name. For example, Dense Discovery aims to help people feel inspired and think critically. Image via Dense Discovery.
Thinking about how you want to help readers may inspire your newsletter name. For example, Dense Discovery aims to help people feel inspired and think critically. Image via Dense Discovery.

Formula #2: Puns and play-on-words

Life is fun when you use more puns. A clever play-on-words is sure to catch your reader’s attention and stand out in their mind.

Examples of this type of newsletter name are:

Your newsletter name and landing page copy can connect and sympathize with your audience. Image via Writamins.
Your newsletter name and landing page copy can connect and sympathize with your audience. Image via Writamins.

Formula #3: Your perspective

No matter how saturated you think your niche is, there’s nobody exactly like you. Having a unique perspective or alternative opinion helps your target audience think, “hey, that sounds like me!”

Perspective-based names include:

 

Inspiration can come from anywhere, and Jason Kottke thought up his newsletter name while listening to an audiobook about Leonardo da Vinci. Image via Jason Kottke.
Inspiration can come from anywhere, and Jason Kottke thought up his newsletter name while listening to an audiobook about Leonardo da Vinci. Image via Jason Kottke.

Formula #4: Phrases with a twist

If you like longer newsletter names, look to these “phrase with a twist” examples. Taking a phrase and swapping a word or two can encapsulate a big idea in a small sentence.

Wrap your head around these twisted newsletter examples:

If you want to add more content to your newsletter name or perspective, consider a subheading or tagline for your landing page. Image via The Blog Abroad.
If you want to add more content to your newsletter name or perspective, consider a subheading or tagline for your landing page. Image via The Blog Abroad.

Formula #5: Your name

You don’t need to be someone you’re not in your business. In fact, being yourself makes you more authentic. We noticed that plenty of newsletters are named after the creator or inspired by their name. Establishing a newsletter under your name is a good option if you haven’t chosen a topic yet.

Some creators that use this naming method include:

Ann Handley, a Wall Street Journal bestselling author and marketing leader, shared:

“I wanted to make it feel like a personal message from me to you, with an ‘insider’ feel. So the ‘Total’ says it’s All Me — it’s not written and sent by anyone other than me. And the play on my name with ‘Annarchy’ creates a kind of community, world view, and perspective.”Ann Handley, founder of Total Annarchy

Ann Handley, founder of Total Annarchy

Formula #6: Your blog’s name (or a subsidiary of it)

If you’re creating a newsletter after establishing a blog or brand, you might carry the theme to the inbox. You can either go by “The [Company Name] Newsletter,” or a subsidiary phrase.

Here are some examples:

We’ve all heard that a picture is worth a thousand words, so the images you choose for your landing page can set the tone of your newsletter. Image via The DO Lectures.
We’ve all heard that a picture is worth a thousand words, so the images you choose for your landing page can set the tone of your newsletter. Image via The DO Lectures.

Formula #7: Alliteration

Attention, all alliteration addicts, these examples are up your alley. Simple phrases with the same leading letters roll off the tongue and are the newsletter name of choice for these creators:

Formula #8: Time-based

Consistency is critical for a successful newsletter—putting the send day or frequency in the name sets expectations early. The only thing to keep in mind if you’re thinking of using this naming formula: choose a time you can commit to. Here are our favorite time-based newsletter names:

5 places to include your newsletter name

After you’ve chosen a name, it’s time to shout it from the rooftops! Or, more realistically (and probably safer), your landing pages and signup forms.

Here are five essential spots you should share your new-found identity:

Landing page

Think of your newsletter landing page as the front gate into your magical kingdom of content. This is the spot where you’ll let potential subscribers know what to expect from your emails and give them a place to sign up. The example from Eric Friedensohn’s newsletter Extra Paint below tells you how often you’ll receive the newsletter and the type of content to expect.

 

 

Your newsletter landing page should tell subscribers what type of content to expect, and how often you’ll show up in their inbox. Image via Efdot Studio.
Your newsletter landing page should tell subscribers what type of content to expect, and how often you’ll show up in their inbox. Image via Efdot Studio.

And if you want to show off your favorite or most recent newsletters on your landing page, you can set up a Newsletter Feed.

Example of a ConvertKit Newsletter feed
Example of a ConvertKit Newsletter feed.

Think of a Newsletter feed like your blog or an Instagram feed- your audience can get more insight into who you are as a creator as they read through your content, giving them more opportunity to trust your insights and increases the chances they’ll join your email list.

Sign up form

Another spot to include your newsletter name is on the sign up form. These smaller blocks won’t have as much information as a full landing page, but you’ll have plenty of room to present your value proposition.

ConvertKit’s form builder lets you choose a form that’s inline with your page, pops up on your site, or slides in as someone browses your blog. The Butter Half newsletter signup is inline with the content on the home page.

Newsletter sign up forms fit on any page in your website and give people a place to sign up for your emails. Image via The Butter Half.
Newsletter sign up forms fit on any page in your website and give people a place to sign up for your emails. Image via The Butter Half.

Sender name / Subject line

Once someone signs up for your newsletter, you need to carry your branding into the inbox. The first place to include your name is in the subject line or as part of your sender name.

For example, Chaitra Radhakrishna includes both her name and business name in the “from” section. “Chaitra from PinkPot” puts her front and center as the creator, while also giving context about her company.

Your sender name helps people identify your newsletter in their inbox, so make sure it’s descriptive and consistent. Image via Pinkpot Studio.
Your sender name helps people identify your newsletter in their inbox, so make sure it’s descriptive and consistent. Image via Pinkpot Studio.

Another example of putting your newsletter branding front and center is Khe Hy’s subject line, “Welcome to RadReads.”

Welcome emails are important for kicking off the subscriber relationship, and including your newsletter name in the subject line makes it stand out. Image via RadReads.
Welcome emails are important for kicking off the subscriber relationship, and including your newsletter name in the subject line makes it stand out. Image via RadReads.

Top of email

Once a subscriber gets into an email, you can include your branding at the top of the message in a header image. In the example from Sleeping Should Be Easy below, the message starts with the blog’s logo. Adding a header image is a simple way to add personality. Just make sure to add alt text to preserve deliverability.

We’re firm believers that text-based are the way to go, but that doesn’t mean your newsletter has to be plain. A simple logo at the top goes a long way for brand recognition. Image via Sleeping Should Be Easy.
We’re firm believers that text-based are the way to go, but that doesn’t mean your newsletter has to be plain. A simple logo at the top goes a long way for brand recognition. Image via Sleeping Should Be Easy.

Footer

If you want to make your emails feel more personal and connect your face to the brand, consider a stylized footer. Austin Saylor uses a photo in his email footer to humanize the message. The footer is also a great place to build anticipation about what’s to come or link to useful pages like your best content or paid resources.

It helps to put a face to a name, so including your image at the bottom of each newsletter builds familiarity. Image via Austin Saylor.
It helps to put a face to a name, so including your image at the bottom of each newsletter builds familiarity. Image via Austin Saylor.

Ready to start something new? ConvertKit can help

A great newsletter name is important – but your newsletter also needs to deliver compelling content over time.

Luckily, ConvertKit makes it easy to launch your newsletter, collect subscribers, and grow your business online.

Sign up for your free account and start growing your newsletter audience today!

The post 30+ of the best newsletter names (and how to name yours) appeared first on ConvertKit.

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