How to create a one-page website that gets results

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You’re working hard on building your audience. You’re ready to get even more focused and launch a website for your business… But you’re overwhelmed and don’t know where to start.
It’s no surprise. A full-blown website build and launch can take 8 weeks or longer and it can be an expensive project, starting at a minimum of $2,000.
Want a better way to launch a successful website? You’re in the right place. In this guide, I’ll dive into what a one-page website can do for you and your business, including examples, benefits, and tips to get you started.

How to create a one-page website that gets results

What is a one-page website?

A one-page website, also known as a single-page website, is a website that only consists of one page. This type of website doesn’t have any internal links a visitor can click through, but it will typically feature relevant external links.

This means that, unlike a standard website, a one-page website usually won’t have:

  • A contact page
  • An about page
  • A dedicated shop page
  • A navigation bar at the top or the bottom of the website

Think of it this way: what would be separate pages on a typical website becomes sections on a one-page website. A visitor can quickly get to them by scrolling down the page.
Some single-page websites have a navigation bar, but the links on it don’t lead to other pages because there are none. Instead, clicking on each navigation link automatically scrolls down the page and takes the visitor to the relevant section within the same page.

Single-page navigation moves the visitor to the relevant section. Image via Ana Asnes Becker
Single-page navigation moves the visitor to the relevant section. Image via Ana Asnes Becker

How is a one-page website different from a landing page?

Landing pages are also single pages with no internal links. Are one-page websites then synonymous to landing pages?

Not quite—here’s why.

Landing pages have a single focus: they aim to get the visitor to act on a clear and obvious call to action. That call to action correlates with that landing page’s title and entire content. There’s nothing to distract from that CTA—not even links.

The one action means that if the visitor resonates with the message on the landing page, it’s really easy for them to take that action.

The single focus of your landing page could be:

Landing pages don’t give the visitor any options other than the main CTA. Image via The Thrive Life Project
Landing pages don’t give the visitor any options other than the main CTA. Image via The Thrive Life Project

One-page websites can also have a call to action, but unlike with landing pages, it’s not their single goal.

For example, an online video coach may have an overarching website goal of selling her online masterclass. But other than that, she can also mention and link to:

  • Her recent press appearances
  • A free checklist download
  • Pieces from her client portfolio
  • Her Instagram profile and YouTube channel

Even though these links may seem to distract from the ultimate goal of selling a masterclass, they actually nudge the reader closer to it. Press, free content, and a strong portfolio help this hypothetical creator build trust with the visitor before they’re ready to buy.

That’s exactly what John Taylor Tucker, a YouTube creator, did with his one-page website. He wants his visitors to visit his Instagram profile, YouTube channel, and to contact him, but that’s not all he shares. He also links to his most popular projects, embeds his best videos, and features photos of his work.

You can use a one-page website to show the breadth of your reach and expertise. Image via John Taylor Tucker
You can use a one-page website to show the breadth of your reach and expertise. Image via John Taylor Tucker

Why landing pages can be used as one-page websites

There’s a middle point between landing pages and one-page websites: you can turn your landing page into a one-page website.

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Just like you can make a standard landing page as short or as long as necessary to nudge your visitor towards the CTA, you can also add hyper-relevant links, resources, and trust signals like press mentions and testimonials.

That’s exactly what The Rainbow Files project did with their landing page. The main CTA is obvious, but there’s much more to the page than that. The copy goes deeper into the why behind the mockups that celebrate diversity. There’s also:

  • A contact email address
  • An external link that explains the basics of PSD mockups
  • Links to a design consultancy and a LinkedIn profile
  • Plenty of visuals
The Rainbow Files can function as a standalone one-page website, even though it’s built as a landing page. Image via The Rainbow Files
The Rainbow Files can function as a standalone one-page website, even though it’s built as a landing page. Image via The Rainbow Files

Your version can be richer with details or more simplistic and text-based. Here’s an example of a freelance writer one-page website, built completely in ConvertKit’s landing page builder using a template:

Driving visitors towards the ‘hire me’ CTA is much easier with testimonials, portfolio, and press mentions that build trust. Image via Marijana Kay
Driving visitors towards the ‘hire me’ CTA is much easier with testimonials, portfolio, and press mentions that build trust. Image via Marijana Kay

The takeaway? You can start building your one-page website with as little as a landing page template.

In fact, you can create a one-page website with a ConvertKit landing page template in just a few minutes. All you need to do is choose your template, add some imagery, change the colors, write your copy and you’re live. No coding necessary!

ConvertKit’s pre-build landing page templates make it easy to create your one page website.
ConvertKit’s pre-build landing page templates make it easy to create your one page website.

5 benefits of a one-page website for selling your products or services

Single-page websites aren’t just a fad. If you choose to take this route, you can make a massive impact on your platform, audience, and business because a one-page website brings results. Here’s how:

One page websites are hyper-specific to your audience

Do you feel that having just one page on your website reduces your chances of getting traction, readers, subscribers, and ultimately paying customers?

Good news: it’s quite the opposite. Boiling your message down to a single page will bring clarity to your online presence. It also puts your target audience front and center and shortens the time between when a visitor first arrives to your website and the moment they know they’re in the right place.

After all, it takes around seven seconds to form a first impression—and for websites, this could be as short as 0.05 seconds. Making it clear who you serve and how will give you an advantage.

You’ll also reduce the chances for overchoice, also known as choice overload, in which people have a difficult time making a decision when they’re faced with too many options. There won’t be too many options because you’ll only feature what’s most relevant and valuable to your visitor.

One page websites are simple, clean, and uncluttered

One page websites erase clutter. They’re structured as a story with a beginning, a middle, and an ending. You’re the storyteller.

Your visitor won’t have to choose their own adventure—they simply follow the storyline. They’ll get maximum value because they won’t have to jump from page to page to find it. There’s no room for less important details that distract the user.

One-page websites are simple and aesthetically pleasing, which also makes them great for mobile viewing. That’s huge, considering the average media use on smartphones in the US is 203 minutes per day.

One-page websites work well on mobile devices. GIF via Gary Sheng
One-page websites work well on mobile devices. GIF via Gary Sheng

One page websites are engaging and convert well

The above two benefits combined make up the third one: high engagement and conversions.

One-page websites bring instant value. Any visitor that isn’t the target audience quickly leaves, while your ideal readers don’t need to look far to find resources they need. You’re speaking directly to them.

Need proof? Check out Rigbooks, an online bookkeeping platform for truckers. Prior to moving to a one-page website, they marketed their business in a typical software fashion: tour, pricing, FAQ, blog, and more, all on their own separate pages.

Multi-page websites can give visitors too many options and distractions. Image via Rigbooks on Wayback Machine
Multi-page websites can give visitors too many options and distractions. Image via Rigbooks on Wayback Machine

After moving everything to a single page and stripping the website down to the key message, their conversions quadrupled. On the page, you’ll find all the essential elements of a great one-page website: the exact words their audience uses to describe their pain points, answers to key questions, customer testimonials, and a strong call to action for a free trial.

Single-page websites can place the focus on your most important message. Image via Rigbooks.com
Single-page websites can place the focus on your most important message. Image via Rigbooks.com

One page websites let you launch your products and services quickly

You’ve been working hard on building trust with your audience on other platforms like Instagram or YouTube. Your audience knows exactly what you’re about—they know you can solve their pain points and challenges.

In other words, you’re ready to launch these solutions, but you feel you need a long, fancy product page. Luckily, you don’t! You’ve already shared everything they need to know through your emails, YouTube videos, Instagram stories, and more.

The next step? Direct your supporters to a place where they can buy from you.

Where? You’ve guessed it—your one-page website. Dedicate a section of it to your products, such as online courses and digital downloads. Then, connect these product links to platforms like Teachable or Shopify to sell them—no product page needed.

Promote your paid product with a simple landing page. Image via SistaSense
Promote your paid product with a simple landing page. Image via SistaSense

One page websites are easy to maintain

When you need to update your one-page website, you can do it quickly and you can be sure there are no pages you forgot to update.

Here are some website updates you may have to do regularly:

  • Product or service pricing
  • Next client opening
  • Most recent testimonials
  • New headshots or product photographs

Instead of having to update your homepage, about page, services page, and portfolio, you only need to look after a single page. It will leave you with more time to create content and products your audience is looking for.

7 one-page website best practices (and examples to inspire you!)

Ready to create your own single-page website? Here are some best practices to consider. Pick those you resonate with the most and use these examples to take action!

Make your current website goal obvious

What is your current intention around building your audience or generating income? Make this promptly visible at the top of your website. As you build value for your followers and subscribers on other platforms, they’ll know what to do as soon as they land on your website.

Are you pre-launching a product? Selling tickets? Promoting a service? Publishing a book? Spell the details out and let your visitors know how they can support you with a clear call to action.

Vahur Kubja puts ticket sales front and center. Image via Vahur Kubja, translated to English
Vahur Kubja puts ticket sales front and center. Image via Vahur Kubja, translated to English

Promote your best work to build reputation and trust

One of the best ways to position yourself as a reputable creator is to put your best work front and center. You can use your one-page website to promote your articles, videos, podcasts, graphics, live talks, social media campaigns, and other work that speaks to your expertise.

Instead of just sharing links or graphics, feel free to add short summaries, results you’ve achieved, fun facts, and relevant testimonials from clients or customers to complete your visitor’s experience.

Ana Asnes Becker sets the tone with her work for The Wall Street Journal. Image via Ana Asnes Becker
Ana Asnes Becker sets the tone with her work for The Wall Street Journal. Image via Ana Asnes Becker

Match sections and their order to your story and your audience

Some websites let the visitor choose their own adventure. That’s not the case with one-page websites—you build your visitor’s journey for them.

Map out your key sections and ensure you’re covering all bases. Keep in mind that each section should build upon the previous one. For example, a call to action to schedule a discovery call makes sense after a section about services you offer.

Get inspired by your main areas of work such as product or service categories, topics you talk about on your other channels, and specifics from your industry. Here are some sample sections for different types of creators:

  • Musician: short bio, upcoming events, where to listen (links to Spotify, YouTube, etc.), selected album reviews, contact details, email subscription form
  • Business coach and author: short bio, selected client logos, details of coaching services and questionnaire, upcoming speaking events, latest YouTube video, email subscription form, latest from Instagram
  • Freelance designer: short introduction, most recent project, short bio, selected client logos, list of awards won, project booking form

Send your visitors to various resources

Which resources can you share based on your overarching website goal? Which micro-goals can you set to support it?

Consider sharing articles you were featured in, podcasts you appeared on, your social media accounts, video testimonials, and other useful links for this purpose. You can set a separate, smaller goal for each section to track alongside your big goal like product sales or service bookings.

For example, Kenny Stills promotes media mentions on his website to help bring attention to his activism work.

Kenny Stills brings attention to press coverage of his activism. Image via Kenny Stills
Kenny Stills brings attention to press coverage of his activism. Image via Kenny Stills

Feature a strong bio

Add an About section that speaks to your experience and knowledge. It doesn’t need to be long—even a single paragraph can be enough. Write your bio with phrases and words your ideal reader would use to describe what you’re good at.

Your bio can mention your years of experience, past customers or clients, results you’ve generated, and types of work that fire you up the most.

Pauline Osmont positions herself as the expert through years of experience and project goals. Image via Pauline Osmont
Pauline Osmont positions herself as the expert through years of experience and project goals. Image via Pauline Osmont

You can also use your bio to outline the process of working with you, buying from you, or subscribing to your email list.

Some questions you can use to guide you:

  • What steps are involved?
  • What is their timeline?
  • What can the reader expect?
  • What tools or frameworks do you use to make the results happen?
Melanie Daveid outlines her UX design process when working with clients. Image via Melanie Daveid
Melanie Daveid outlines her UX design process when working with clients. Image via Melanie Daveid

Get personal

Your website and your business all come down to you. You’re their core. Yes, your content and your products match your audience’s needs, but they need to trust you first in order to trust your offers.

Getting real and raw with your audience is a great way to go. Talk about not only what you do and how you can help them, but also about your beginnings, values, causes you support, the way you spend your days and what you do for fun.

By getting personal, you’ll build the ‘know, like, and trust’ factor in the long run.

Shannon Franklin uses a unique tone of voice and her story to get closer to her audience. Image via Shannon Franklin
Shannon Franklin uses a unique tone of voice and her story to get closer to her audience. Image via Shannon Franklin

Set clear objectives and expectations around contacting you

If your main goal is to get visitors to contact you, get explicit about why you want them to contact you, as well as what to expect once they do. By doing this, you’ll make sure you only hear from ideal customers, clients, and collaborators, and you’ll make the process enjoyable for you and for them.

Consider these questions when writing your contact section:

  • How do you want to engage with people that contact you? Think paid projects, content collaboration, free mentoring, etc.
  • Which channels are you available through? Email only, phone calls, something else?
  • How soon can you get back to contact requests?
Adrian Cabrero shares his email, contact number, and next availability for freelance projects. Image via Adrian Cabrero
Adrian Cabrero shares his email, contact number, and next availability for freelance projects. Image via Adrian Cabrero

Create your one-page website in ConvertKit for free

Now you know—you don’t need a 20-page website to launch your business and earn an income doing what you love. You can start with a simple one-page website that you can build with ConvertKit’s landing pages.

Ready to get your single-page website ready for your audience? Check out the landing page template library and pick a template that gives you the space you need. You can build your page without coding and completely free.

The post How to create a one-page website that gets results appeared first on ConvertKit.

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