Data is Not a Dirty Word

Data is the oxygen that powers business today. It underlies everything we need to do to run a healthy business.

As we all know, there are many challenges and success drivers in data strategy. We got some of our data thought leaders to join Tunc Bolluk for a discussion about the role of data across business, the importance of data quality in your CRM, and what you can do today to improve your data quality.

Here are a few of the key takeaways Guy Hanson and Andrew Fragias shared:

  • When being examined, data quality should be viewed through the lenses of the 3Cs: Compliance, Correctness, and Completeness.
  • Guy Hanson discussed the trend of organisations moving to customer data platforms (CDPs), which begs the question: Do CRMs or CDPs do a better job when it comes to data quality?
  • Two of the top four data quality KPIs are financial: revenue and conversion rates. While they don’t measure data quality directly, they do act as indicators to help businesses understand if their data is complete and if they are successfully engaging and converting their customers.
  • Andrew Fragias walked us through the 3Cs from a Salesforce Admin’s point of view, explaining where problems can arise and how you can fix them.

The group also shared examples of best practices and discussed some of the findings from the recently published report Email Data Quality: Compliant, Correct, Complete. Check out the full webinar below:

 

The post Data is Not a Dirty Word appeared first on Validity.

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